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Roasted chicken breast with fresh herbs served over wilted Swiss chard and smashed fingerling potatoes

Roasted chicken breast with fresh herbs served over wilted Swiss chard and smashed fingerling potatoes

Chef Tristan Toleno

Riverview Café, Brattleboro, VT

Ingredients:

  • Ingredients for the Potatoes:
  • 2 lbs Fingerling potatoes, washed
  • ½ bunch fresh thyme
  • ½ head garlic, broken into cloves
  • 2 tsp salt
  • 1 Tbsp olive oil
  • Salt and pepper
  • Ingredients for the Swiss chard:
  • 3 lbs Swiss (or Rainbow) chard, washed and dried
  • 2 Tbsp olive oil
  • ½ head of garlic, cloves peeled and sliced to 1/8 inch slices
  • Salt and pepper
  • Ingredients for Chicken:
  • 1 Tbsp canola oil
  • 4 Statler Cut chicken breasts, with skin.(a boneless breast with the first wing segment attached)
  • Salt and Pepper
  • 1 Shallot, peeled and sliced ¼ inch thick
  • ½ bunch fresh thyme
  • 1 tsp olive oil
  • ½ cup white wine
  • ½ cup water or chicken stock
  • 1 Tbsp butter or olive oil

Method:

(Pre-heat oven to 450 for chicken)
Place potatoes, thyme and garlic in a large pot and cover with cold water. Add 2 tsp salt and bring water to a boil on high heat.  Once boiling, turn heat down to a low simmer and cover. Cook until a paring knife enters a potato smoothly, about 15-20 minutes, depending on the size of the potatoes.
Drain potatoes and return to the pot to keep warm. 
When you are ready to plate, add the olive oil seasonings, and smash the potatoes with a fork or masher. Serves 4.

 

Swiss Chard:
Using a pairing knife, cut down each side of the stem to separate the stems and leaves. Cut the stems into1-inch pieces. Set the leaves aside.
In a covered sauce pan, heat the olive oil on medium-low heat. Add garlic slices and cook until tender (do not over-heat the oil or brown the garlic). Add the stems, a pinch of salt, and cook (covered) until the stems are tender, approximately 8 minutes.
Add the leaves, a pinch more salt, and continue cooking, stirring occasionally, for 5 more minutes. When the leaves become tender, add some fresh black pepper.
To plate, lay the chard down as a bed beneath the chicken.

 

Chicken:
While the potatoes and chard are cooking, begin the chicken. Pre-heat oven to 450.
Heat a heavy bottomed oven-safe sauté pan on the stove at medium high heat.
Add oil and immediately add the chicken breasts, skin side down.  Salt and pepper the breasts.
Without moving the chicken, cook 2-3 minutes.
In a small bowl, mix the shallots, thyme and olive oil. Add them to the pan.
Once the herbs have been added, place the pan in the oven. Bake for 10 minutes, or until fully cooked through and juices run clear when chicken is pierced with a sharp knife.
Remove the pan from the oven and place the chicken on a separate plate (discarding the thyme). Add the water and wine to the pan to drop the temperature and deglaze the bottom. Add butter (or olive oil) and swirl to make a sauce.
Place the chicken over the bed of chard and drizzle the sauce over the top.
Serves 4.

 

Recommended wine/beer for Roasted chicken breast with fresh herbs served over wilted Swiss chard and smashed fingerling potatoes:

Inman Pinot Gris [Russian River Valley, California, USA]

The homey and familiar flavors of roasted chicken breast are so fun to work with - and Chef Toleno has given us a classic presentation to address with a versatile wine. The deglazing of the pan with white wine and the presence of shallots and thyme make this dish just beg for a white wine with an earthy edge. The Inman family in California’s Russian River is a boutique winery devoted to their 13,000 vines of Pinot Noir and Pinot Gris. The Pinot Gris is a terrific match for the chicken dish -- with its earthy flavors and bright texture. Its version is more like the full-bodied Alsatian style, as opposed to the light Italian Pinot Grigio. This wine has the tension of excellent body and balancing acidity, and is just what this dish needs.

 

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