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Primal Grill with Steven Raichlen

Latest Episodes

Gaucho describes the cowboys of northern Argentina and southern Brazil. These rustic cattle herders developed a simple yet powerful style of grilling over an open wood fire, a tradition still celebrated around Planet Barbecue today. Here are three indispensible gaucho favorites: Chicken roasted in a salt crust, from Uruguay's celebrity grill master, Francis Mallmann; the monster beef ribs that made the reputation of Brazil's famous grill house, Fogo de Chao; and a dessert from Brazil's cattle country, a pineapple you roast on the rotisserie.

In 1516, a Spanish explorer encountered a band of Taino Indians roasting game and seafood on a wooden frame over a smoky fire. They called the cooking device a barbacoa-the origin of modern barbecue. This show takes us to the birthplace of barbecue-the Caribbean-where you'll learn to make Jamaican jerk chicken, buccaneer baby back ribs with pineapple barbecue sauce, and a Raichlen classic: shrimp grilled on sugarcane. Jamaican Jerk Chicken; Buccaneer Baby Back Ribs with Pineapple Barbecue Sauce; Shrimp Grilled on Sugarcane.

The first "grills" possessed neither grates nor burners. The grilling was done right in the embers. The march towards barbecue enlightenment hasn't completely eliminated this primal method of grilling. In this show, you'll learn how to roast eggplants in the embers to make Middle Eastern baba ghanouj and see how a caveman might have cooked sweet potatoes. Our main dish routinely makes eyes pop and jaws drop in Bogota, Colombia: beef tenderloin wrapped in salt and cloth and roasted in the embers. And for dessert, an ingenious twist on that campfire classic, the S'more.

Barbecue means meat to millions of grill masters, of course, but it's also about vegetables. Just ask one of India's 300 million vegetarians, who love tandoori (Indian barbecue pit cooking) every bit as much as a carnivore does. When it comes to bringing out the caramelized sweetness of a vegetable, nothing beats the searing heat of a grill. In this Episode, Steven will show you a barbecue where vegetarians will not feel like second-class citizens. On the menu?

Meat on a stick represented the first technological leap forward in the evolution of barbecue. The popularity of kebabs and sates around the world attests to the universal appeal of skewered foods. So why do so many kebabs come on bamboo skewers with burnt ends or on metal skewers with raw onions, overcooked meat, and tomatoes that fall into the embers? If you've ever had trouble nailing the perfect shish kebab, or you want to expand your repertoire, this show is for you.

The statistics are in and the winner is...definitely not lamb. Americans consume less than 1 pound per person per year. But on any given night, more pit masters around the world are grilling lamb than probably any other meat. The lamb zone begins in Morocco and extends east all the way to New Zealand. You cannot consider yourself a well-rounded grill master until you've mastered lamb. Fall-off-the-bone-tender lamb Barbacoa marinated in a smoky adobo sauce. Succulent yogurt-marinated Lamb Chops served over saffron rice.

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