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Dining with the Chef

Latest Episodes

Chef Saito and Yu Hayami visit the far northern prefecture of Akita and learn about Akita's cooking over two episodes. In this second episode, they learn about koji, used to make indispensable Japanese ingredients like miso, soy sauce, sake, or mirin. The town of Yokote, Akita is famous nationwide for its rice, and the town's food culture features many fermented items based on the use of this exceptional rice has been used to make koji since long ago. By mixing koji and salt, they can make the all-purpose condiment shio-koji that has been sweeping Japan the past few years.

In this episode, the hosts visit the far northern prefecture of Akita and learn about Akita's cooking over two episodes. In the second episode, they learn about koji, which is used to make indispensable Japanese ingredients like miso, soy sauce, sake, or mirin. The town of Yokote, Akita is famous nationwide for its rice, and the town's food culture features many fermented items based on the use of this rice, which has long been used to make koji. By mixing koji and salt, they're able to make the all-purpose condiment shio-koji that has been sweeping Japan the past few years.

In this episode, the hosts will visit Chiba. Its location on the Pacific coast gives it a temperate climate perfect for farming and fishing, making it a great place to find delicious foods. Host Yu Hayami will visit the town of Isumi, located in southern Chiba, to show the joys of the town through the local people. They'll also meet a local chef who will show a local type of futomaki sushi, a popular food for special occasions in the area. The variety of different traditional rolling techniques on display has earned this local dish a lot of attention in recent years.

Townscapes from the Edo period still exist in the Sawara District of Katori City, Chiba Prefecture, an unexplored tourist spot where visitors can experience traditional Japan. Visiting this town, where skilled chefs demonstrate Japanese cooking techniques, is just like traveling back to that period in time. In this episode, Kaiseki banquet-style cuisine will be introduced-a feast for the both the eyes and the tongue-made using original high-grade ingredients that are unique to Japanese cuisine, such as traditional seasonings, mizu-shio salted water, and kuzu starch.

Townscapes from the Edo period still exist in the Sawara District of Katori City, Chiba Prefecture, and unexplored tourist spot where visitors can experience traditional Japan. Visiting this town, where skilled chefs demonstrate Japanese cooking techniques, is just like traveling back to that period in time. In this episode, chef Tatsuo Saito and Yu Hayami introduce Kaiseki banquet-style cuisine, a feast for both the eyes and the tongue, made using original high-grade ingredients that are unique to Japanese cuisine, such as traditional seasonings, mizu-shio salted water, and kuzu starch.

The theme in this episode is sakura shrimp. These clear pink shrimp can only be caught in fall and winter, off the coast of Yui, Shizuoka in the Suruga Bay, making them a rare treat. The host and chef will meet the third-generation chef of a seafood restaurant in Yui that boasts 65 years of history, and he'll show a number of dishes made using these unique shrimp. In particular, they'll learn about sakura shrimp kaki-age, made with the lightest batter possible to give it a light, crisp crunch, while letting the sakura shrimp's natural sweetness and color shine through.

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