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My Greek Table with Diane Kochilas

My Greek Table with Diane Kochilas

Hosted by chef, cookbook author and restaurateur Diane Kochilas, the 13-part culinary series MY GREEK TABLE WITH DIANE KOCHILAS celebrates Greek history and culture through food. In the series, Diane travels throughout Greece and its surrounding islands where she showcases many of the foods that Greece is known for (olive oil, feta, honey, yogurt and more), while giving a snapshot of the country's traditions. Then Diane heads back to her kitchen to whip up simple home-cooked meals using the ingredients she highlights in each episode, offering tips on how to cook and pair them in a traditional Greek meal.

Latest Episodes

WGBY Create
Tue Oct 1st, 8:30am
Tue Oct 1st, 2:30pm

Go on a picnic at a vineyard in Naoussa where one grape dominates the table: the local Xinomavro (pronounced xee NOE ma vroe), one of Greece's noblest reds. This delicious, tannic wine pairs perfectly with a cheese and spice stuffed leg of lamb and is the key ingredient in succulent red wine and sage potatoes. Red wine with fish is on the menu, too. Diane makes an easy sea bass and mushroom dish with a splash of Greece's revered northern red. On the wine trail, she also discovers bread, cookies and chocolate truffles all spiked with this hard-to-pronounce but easy-to-love Greek varietal.

WGBY 57/HD
Sat Oct 5th, 2:30pm
WGBY Create
Tue Oct 29th, 8:30am
Tue Oct 29th, 2:30pm

In this episode, Diane introduces viewers to the rich and varied cuisine of the two main island groups in the Aegean: the Cyclades and the Dodecanese. A visual introduction highlights the region's most stunning vistas and seminal foods. In the kitchen, Diane cooks from her basket of Greek island goodies, sharing recipes from Syros, Amorgos, Rhodes and Santorini, while she weaves the aromatic story of one of Greece's most delicious food destinations. Syros Chopped Parsley Salad; Yellow Split Pea and Herb Keftedes over "Married" Capers; Fish Wrapped in Grape Leaves.

Diane explores the ancient grains that Greek cooks still love to use. A hearty, soul-satisfying breakfast grain called hondros, or cracked wheat, gives a great start to the day. Fresh vegetables, green apples and mint add a pop of freshness to an easy bread salad made with a classic Cretan barley rusk called dako or paximadi. Pasta tossed with Greek yogurt and half a dozen fresh herbs provides instant comfort with a taste that's quintessentially Greek.

WGBY 57/HD
Sat Nov 2nd, 2:30pm
WGBY Create
Thu Nov 7th, 8:30am
Thu Nov 7th, 2:30pm

Honey. Figs. Olives. Olive Oil. Cheeses. Nuts. Snails. Spices. These are just a few of the foods that mark one of the most characteristic aspects of Greek cuisine: the continuity of ingredients from as far back as Neolithic times antiquity to the present. In a magical tour of Athens that stretches from a walk with Diane through the bustling modern market to the Ancient Agora with Dr. John Camp, one of the rock stars of archeology, this episode explores the history of this ancient cuisine, making it delightfully relevant to our needs and tastes today.

WGBY Create
Thu Oct 24th, 8:30am
Thu Oct 24th, 2:30pm

In Diane's adopted city of Athens, the food scene has everything to offer, from mouthwatering souvlaki to Michelin-starred haute Greek. In this insider's taste of the Greek capital, the amazing flavors of a bustling modern "ancient" city bubble over in every pot. A stop at one of Diane's favorite souvlaki joints is countered by a visit to one of the city's most cutting-edge restaurants for Greek salad "sorbet" and a stuffed grape leaf that looks like an architect's fantasy.

WGBY 57/HD
Sat Oct 19th, 2:30pm
WGBY Create
Tue Nov 5th, 8:30am
Tue Nov 5th, 2:30pm

Beans and legumes are among the most ancient foods in Greece, a mainstay of the Greek-Mediterranean Diet. But they also provide a kind of edible philanthropy, as Diane discovers in a visit with the founder and volunteers of a humanitarian group that sets up a street side pot of bean soup for anyone in need. They delve into the subject of the soup itself and the role of beans and pulses in Greek culinary history. As a humble food, pulses have sustained Greeks from prehistoric times to the present.

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