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Trails to Oishii Tokyo

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Komatsuna is a spinach-like leaf vegetable from Tokyo that's been grown in the ward of Edogawa, facing Tokyo Bay, for hundreds of years. Even today, Komatsuna is grown in residential areas in Tokyo. There are even vending machines selling freshly-harvested Komatsuna! This time, we dive deep into this special vegetable, sampling classic Japanese cuisine, sweets, noodles and other innovative dishes that feature its unique flavor.

This time, we focus on Konnyaku. This jiggly gray ingredient may have subtle flavoring, but it's an essential part of Japanese cuisine, often used in simmered and fried dishes. Konnyaku is high in fiber and low in calories, and is popular for dieting. It's even been used recently to make bread, noodles, smoothies, and more. From preparation to consumption, we learn all about Konnyaku, which is gaining attention around the world as a superfood.

This time, we focus on Kuruma-ebi, considered the king of shrimp when it comes to Japanese cuisine. With its elegant appearance and full-bodied umami flavor, it's frequently featured as a good luck charm at celebratory feasts. We visit Amakusa, an island with spots recently given World Heritage status, and meet the producers dedicated to bringing the freshest, best-tasting Kuruma-ebi to consumers.

Lemons first came to Japan some 150 years ago, and have since been blended with Japanese citrus fruits to create brand-new types. We journey to a tiny island in the Seto Inland Sea where some 25% of Japanese lemons are grown and discover its unique, lemon-friendly climate and topography. We also see the surprising ways lemon farmers use lemons in Japanese cuisine from tempura to hot pot. Last but not least, we pucker up for some delicious lemon-based sweets.

Lemons first came to Japan some 150 years ago, and have since been bred with Japanese citrus fruits to create new strains. We journey to a tiny island in the Seto Inland Sea, where about a quarter of Japanese lemons are grown, and discover its unique lemon-friendly climate and topography. We also see the surprising ways lemon farmers use lemons in Japanese cuisine from tempura to hot pot. Last but not least, we pucker up for some delicious lemon-based sweets.

This program captures the charm of ingredients found in the food capital of Tokyo. The focus this time is on the king of fish, maguro. Witness the highlight of an auction site at Japan's largest market, Toyosu Market, as one-third of wholesalers are maguro specialists. Our reporter visits Katsuura Fishing Port for a famous haul. Last but not least, don't miss this program's lineup of irresistible maguro dishes.

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